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Author Topic: The Path of the Tuna  (Read 2485 times)

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dlrws6

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Re: The Path of the Tuna
« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2015, 11:30:34 AM »

that sounds like good info, there Brindle.  What was different between online/offline, exactly?
Don't know why, but the car seems to drop back down to the ground much more quickly than when running offline.  Basically, my doubles became single, because the car would drop too abruptly and couldn't make the same distances.

Interesting and as we know. Cars will roll over offline and not online.
:stoopid:

Who knows the anti flip thing might even account for the difference in feel and lap times between online and off.

I'll try and put your findings to work Brindle, I apparently did not quite understand how to make bumps/jumps.
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EX_stream_tuna

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Re: The Path of the Tuna
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2015, 12:36:19 PM »

online jumps worked just fine in GT5... I think the assumption with GT5 was that the lap times on/offline differences were down to small differences in grip.  not sure though... it was only ever anyone's speculation.
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Brindle

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Re: The Path of the Tuna
« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2015, 12:58:59 PM »

I have a question no one seems to have asked or mentioned.

What do the numbers mean when making a corner?  For example, my track is square, with 2 sides being 600m and 2 being 400m long, with 100m turn lengths (thats what i assume is the "m" number displayed.  With a 100m length turn @ "63R" (im assuming turn radius?) seems to make an almost perfect 90 degree curve, but not exactly ("64R" is not perfect either). 

My question is, how does one interpret a turn radius at different lengths to make a specific angle?  "63R" @ 200m is not at all the same curve as a "63R" @ 100m.   
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DudeTuna

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Re: The Path of the Tuna
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2015, 01:39:57 PM »

http://www.mathinary.com/degrees_radians.jsp

I don't do maths, but I see pie is involved so maybe tasty.

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EX_stream_tuna

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Re: The Path of the Tuna
« Reply #19 on: October 22, 2015, 01:49:12 PM »

"I don't got grillz, but I do wear braces.  I know Pi to a thousand places." - Weird Al "White and nerdy"

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dlrws6

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Re: The Path of the Tuna
« Reply #20 on: October 22, 2015, 07:31:15 PM »

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Brindle

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Re: The Path of the Tuna
« Reply #21 on: October 22, 2015, 08:40:55 PM »

I agree it's still useful as far as creating the same curve as you said for ovals and any other track.  The problem lies in not knowing at all what angle to the previous curve/straight the new curve is.

Here's my issue...  Front stretch is 600m long. Turn left 90 degrees (63r @ 100m).  Straight 400m.  Turn left 90 degrees (63r @ 100m). Straight 600m.  Now at this point, you can visually see that two 600m straights are not parallel (toed in, if you will). Ok, so change it to 64r for less angle.  Delete, delete, delete, start from the front straight at 64r's and now I have a toe out.

As you can see, the two equal valued corners are not creating parallel straights as I'd assume.  To make it work out, I had to mix 64 and 63r to make things parallel.  The only way to hope for a 90 degree corner is to just draw it and try to line it up with the edge of the previous straight, but that leads to the above issue.
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dlrws6

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Re: The Path of the Tuna
« Reply #22 on: October 23, 2015, 07:01:07 AM »

My best guess is you are not producing a true 90 degree turn.  probably due to the inaccuracy of a touch screen most likely your producing an 88 or 92 degree turn, causing the straights to not be parallel.

While recreating the Indy oval for my 1909 road course I ran into the same problem.  The only solution I found was to try and rely upon the path projection (orange section) produced by the anchor you set for the turn. if it is not parallel to your straight then the next line you produce will not be parallel.  I made it work for Indy but I had to delete and redo each turn anchor at least a dozen times.
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Brindle

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Re: The Path of the Tuna
« Reply #23 on: October 23, 2015, 09:31:53 AM »

So then...  Keep on guessin at them turns.  Got it.   ;D
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dlrws6

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Re: The Path of the Tuna
« Reply #24 on: October 23, 2015, 11:22:49 AM »

Pretty much. 

The only thing else I can think of from when I was working on Indy, was at some point in the drawing the curves I recall the program was also showing me the distance of the curve.  I believe it was while I was trying to set the anchor point.  I think you have to be zoomed in real close to see it. (say 200ft per inch) Next time I'm using my tablet, I'll see if I can find what I'm remembering or if I can give any better advice.

Which also reminds me.  When placing curbs, at first I found it difficult to get the spaced correctly but I discovered that if you zoom in close enough to the track you can see exactly how much space they take up and its much easier to make long stretches of curbing without breaks.

I guess the moral of the story is, when working on a track, zoom in and get up close and personal to work on the details.
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